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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 152 (some duplicates have been removed)
are coming out on the streets and to vote in an election that matters. >> we'll be live with the latest on the french intervention and where north africa is the new front in the battle against terrorism. and we will be asking why the issue of abortion is still so divided. a special report from mississippi. >> also aaron is taking a look at global unemployment, and that is a huge number, aaron. >> it's a staggering number. 197 million people around the world are now without a jofpblet 13% are under 24. are we creating a generation of non-workers? >> it's 12:00 moon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington and 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem where more than 5.5 million israeliings are expected to vote? an election that is expected to see benjamin netanyahu return to office. he is facing relidgeous parties and while security seen by many as netanyahu's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking
will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a simple in or out referendum by the end of 2017. but the catch is he may not be prime mr. by then. and there are already plenty of voices in your saying that membership is not like a menu where you get to pick and choose. our political correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted
. but the omens are not good. her coalition has just lost a regional election that was widely viewed as a test of public opinion. >> at first, it looked like the german chancellor's party would win. when the final ballots were counted, it became clear the democrats were on their way out. the results show the coalition of angela merkle's party or one seat behind the opposition. the loss by the christian democrats came about because their supporters tried to vote strategically. usually, christian democrat voters cast a ballot for free democrats. at first, they were thrilled at their score. >> i think it is no surprise some conservatives actually gave us a vote to make sure we would be able to continue with the coalition. >> as the votes were counted, it became clear the political blood transfusion had not work. .- worked how could she continued to help the free democrats across germany without hurting her own party poppies -- party potsies popularity. even her star power was not enough to turn things around. keeping the coalition partner ally came at a heavy price, one she may not want to pay ag
and elsewhere around the globe. israelis went to the polls in general elections today. prime minister jet -- prime minister benjamin netanyahu claimed victory after exit polls showed he would likely lead, the government with a narrow majority. our correspondent is in jerusalem with the latest. >> welcome to jerusalem after three months of a lackluster election campaign. suddenly, israeli politics came alive today about an hour before the polls closed. there was growing excitement and speculation. as expected, benjamin netanyahu is likely to lead the next government. he will be the prime minister for the next four years, but it is a weakened prime minister. his coalition did not get the number of seats it wanted. only 31, according to exit polls. that is down from the 42 that the two parties had during the last election. what kind of coalition will be formed? it could be the right and religious parties. that is not what he wants. the television presenter, his party came in second place. he said his party will not expect to be in any coalition. will it be a shaky coalition between the right
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
-- she pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton'
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
freed by the algerian security forces talk about their ordeal. ahead of crucial elections, chancellor merkel puts her full weight behind david mcalister and head-to-head in a nine-goal thriller. reports are coming in that algerian special forces have found 15 burned bodies in the gas plant at the southeast of the country that came under attack by muslim militants. a launch raid was held to free them and they said it prevented a massacre but 30 are still unaccounted for and 12 are unaccounted for and those who escaped have been traumatized. >> hostages celebrating their release. one described the moment the drama began. >> their goal was foreign hostages. they met a bus at the entrance of the base's living quarters. they released a few of us and killed foreigners and algerian forces on the spot then returned to the base and took hostages. >> many died or were hurt when algerian military stormed the area. it's kept officials on edge. >> i spoke with the algerian prime minister again to get an update on this very difficult situation and to underscore, again, that the utmost care must be
to make sure that we move towards free and fair elections so that there is a legitimate post couey election area -- post-coup government. we have got a short-term challenge in restoring their security. the french, i think, in partnership with the military, are doing a great job. there are longer-term challenges, restoring things. this is what led to the rebellion and the coup in the first place. >> do you think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in c
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
concern. i want to play something that ted cruz, newly elected texas senator, republican, had to say this weekend, about gun control. and let's come back and talk about it. >> you know, there actually isn't the so-called gun show loophole, that doesn't exist. any licensed firearm dealer that else at a gun show has to have a background check. what it doesn't apply to is personal sales, one on one. and that's true whether it's at a gun show or -- >> i would point out, the key there is a licensed firearm dealer. some of these people, you can sort of apply as a, you know, you sell at a gun show occasionally, that's the gun show loophole. but, ted cruz gets to speak for lots and lots of people. how do you navigate, whether it's in delaware or nationally with what your father is trying to do, how do you navigate the politics of this? there's a reason the assault weapons ban sunseted in '04, because the politics of it simply didn't sustain. there's a reason barack obama didn't talk all that much about it in 2008. how do you keep the momentum to do something? >> the facts are important. sena
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, but what we are doing is celebrating each other and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy not only of our past but also of our future. god bless you guys. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. (applause) >> the president and the first lady the vice president, the second lady seeming chipper after his official swearing in earlier today. this party was a candlelight vigil. it's not exactly a vigil, it's more of a party. there are a lot of people in that room who paid a lot of money for this inauguration and prior to tonight to get barack obama re-elected. to get a flavor of what's going on in the room these are individual and corporate donors. to get tickets to this event if you were an individual if you wanted the washington package in addition to a couple seats to the parade or other items you had to donate 250,000 dollars if you were a corporation you had to donate a million. the packages wen
. >> brown: then, from tel aviv, margaret warner reports on the israeli elections, as prime minister benjamin netanyahu's party was on track to stay in power by a narrow margin. netanyahu tries to put together, it's sure to include new faces and new agendas that will influence the country. >> ifill: we examine a new study on concussions, showing the impact of hard hits on the brains of living but retired n.f.l. players. >> i go through stages where i think how come i can't remember that and i always wondered are these age-related or are they conclusion related? >> brown: and we mark the 40th anniversary of the "roe v. wade" decision by the supreme court, with a look at the strategies of abortion rights advocates and opponents. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only a river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world. and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway.
that republicans should whine about. he did win the election he's entitled to try this very liberal strategy and see if it succeeds for him and if it's the way to get his agenda through. i tend to have my doubts. we're all going to find out. >> brown: rev. hamilton, by your role you get involved in all the social issues of our time. did you hear the president making a kind of aggressionive statement about, "this is the way forward for all of us" or did you hear him reaching out to embrace people, to help create that? >> i think it's a great question. i wish he had done more to reach out. in fact that was the point of my message today at the national cathedral was to say, you know, we need a new american vision that's not just democratic or not just republican. it has to be a new vision that brings people together. if we had a new vision with key strategic goals that republicans and democrats have crafted together and say this is what we're going to work together over the next ten years, it would have a huge impact on bringing americans together. i wish that he had done more of that >> brown:
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
rejectionists. >> we saw in pennsylvania there is so much of the willingness to rig the election. they know they're heading into trouble and it's almost like lebanon. you know? and when i see them doing it, we're never going to be popular again so, we're going to have to rig it so gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections? that is how bad nbc has gotten that. is their coverage. >> a couple points about this quote, unquote news network. on the gettysburg address, chris matthews has it exactly wrong. just the opposite. gettiesberg address was an attempt at healing the nation's wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech, yesterday, was a left wing declaration of war against conservative movement. so it was the opposite. as for the rigging charge this is classic msnbc. going back to 2004 with keith onerman refusing to concede ohio going to bush. this is how bizarre msnbcs now, they're saying this is -- a great conspiracy to rig elections. i don't know what they're talking about. >> oos s-. >> sean: listen this, is an extension of the obama white house, they'
in washington. let at the start with this. it used to be the only way to get elected in the south was to be the farthest out there in backing segregation. anyone who showed moderation was seen as soft. anyone who talked compromise on civil rights was suspected of being on the other side. well, to win in today's republican party, which began displacing the dixiekrats a half century ago, you have to be the farthest out there backing guns. show moderation you get your nra badge ripped off you. agree to any rule on gun safety and you're marked as a traitor for life. today some of the top people in the republican party, the people to watch, marco rubio, rand paul, ted cruz are right out there front in opposing president obama on gun safety. so what happened? why is the gop, the party of guns over people? our guests are congresswoman carolyn mccarthy, a democrat of new york, and cynthia tucker, a pulitzer prize winning columnist. thank you both for joining us. you have been in this fight for so long, congresswoman mccarthy. i have to ask you, is there something out there in the water th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 152 (some duplicates have been removed)

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